Friday, 20 October 2017

Friday Homework for Lesson 40: Du Vos Stitch

Here is my homework for the Du Vos Stitch, the #40 of Sunday Stitch School's collection.

As it is an 'outline' stitch, I used it to 'draw' the edges of an oak leaf and three acorns.
The fabric is kimono silk, and the thread two strands of DMC floss.

This is a UFO, and I will fill in the leaf and acorns, turn it all into a greeting card. The picture will be posted on Wednesday for the WIPW.

...............

Now, with these pictures I want to clarify the difference between the Du Vos Stitch, Stem Stitch and Outline Stitch.


Thursday, 19 October 2017

WIPW - MOLA - Revealing the Fabric Underneath

Work In Progress Wednesday.

MOLA
I have had very limited time to work on my Mola, but have started revealing the first layer of fabric underneath the black top.
I have also appliquéd the black cut out part of the leaf and one flower.
More excavating of fabric underneath next week.

MOLA - Snippets of Interest
If you are a quilter, when you hear the word Mola, you might instantly think of colourful quilts of reverse appliqué. Actually the name Mola means blouse or garment.
This blouse is part of the folk costume worn by the women of the Cuna Indians on the San Blas Islands in Central America.
Onto the  highly decorative square panel, a yoke and sleeves are attached.
Traditionally the Cuna Indians used paint to decorate their bodies. When they got in contact with Westerners (Spanish colonists and missionaries), and thereby also had access to fabric, the geometric designs were worked on blouses instead.
(Sources: Hemmets HandarbetsLexikon, Eva Köhlmark: Broderiboken, Elizabeth Healey: Stitch, Fabric & Thread)

Tuesday, 17 October 2017

TAST 149: Slipped Cable Chain Stitch

TAST stands for Take A Stitch Tuesday which is an online course of stitches on Sharon Boggon's Pintangle. Join in and learn. If you want to do it from scratch, there will be a rerun starting next year.
Read more about it here.
Learn the Slipped Cable Chain Stitch here.

As I have explained before, I want all the TAST stitches in one (private) collection and will give them the chronological number in the order I learn them. 
So now it is time for Slipped Cable Chain Stitch,  which I will call TAST #149.


Isn't it beautiful?




Sunday, 15 October 2017

Sunday Stitch School - Lesson 40 - Du Vos Stitch

Another Sunday and another stitch is upon us at Sunday Stitch School.

Do you remember I pleaded for help and asked for information about the '?-Stitch'?
Thank you so much for the feedback.

It is a good linear stitch and will be needed for the next Sunbonnet Sue (next week's lesson).

As no one has given me a name I will nick-name this stitch Du Vos Stitch in honour of the teacher who taught my friend. I think that name is better than Staggered Back Stitch, which is the only other name I could think of.

Work it like this:









On my Aida sampler:

Homework:
You are free to do whatever you like with this stitch, but please NO more poetry!

Friday, 13 October 2017

Friday Homework for Lesson 39: Granitos

Time to hand in Friday Homework for Sunday Stitch School.

This week the stitch is called Granitos, I guess Granito is singular, but then my Spanish has not improved since last Sunday!


Student:

If Granitos mean small grains, 

then I can sew 

Granito grains of sand,

green cacti Granitos,

with blue Granito flowers, 

Chain stitched stems from where

purple Granito blossoms dangle,

and white Granito petals sprout, 

while yellow Granito petals,

on top of Stem stitched stems

spread out from black Granito crossed centres....

Teacher:
Since when was your homework poetry?
The task was BIOLOGY!

Student:
But all these plants, and the sand, too, IS biology - flora and geology!

Teacher:
Well, at least your stitching is not as awful as your verse!


Wednesday, 11 October 2017

WIPW - MOLA Try Outs and Preparation

Work In Progress Wednesday. This week I have only the new

MOLA
project to report on.
Last week I had got this far on my sampler.

Since then I have made some of the slits with fabric inserted.
These long ones were easy.

With the triangles and squares I hit a problem; the pieces I inserted were a bit too scant, and as I also failed to place them exactly underneath the holes, raw edges peeped out! 
From now on I will be using a pair of pointed tweezers to place the pieces correctly and hold them in place with a pin until the first edge is sewn down.


I also noticed that the fabric frays too much so I will opt for as much batik as possible for this project.

For the top layer, though,  I will use the remains of the black sheeting I used to back Trinity Green, but I will fix the edges with fray guard at tricky points.

 
I polished the design sketch, made some notes

and marked the black top,
then basted the three layers together.






Tuesday, 10 October 2017

TAST 148: Whipped Double Chain Stitch

TAST stands for Take A Stitch Tuesday which is an online course of stitches on Sharon Boggon's Pintangle. Join in and learn. If you want to do it from scratch, there will be a rerun starting next year.
Read more about it here.
Learn it here.

As I have explained before, I want all the TAST stitches in one (private) collection and will give them the chronological number in the order I learn them. 
So now it is time for Whipped Double Chain Stitch,  which I will call TAST #148.






Sunday, 8 October 2017

Sunday Stitch School - Lesson 39: Granitos

Welcome to Sunday Stitch School.

On the request of a student, we are today changing to another subject, Biology, and will study grains.
We will cling on to Geography in a sense, and also branch into Geology and Languages.

Today's stitch is called Granitos.
Many sources claim it stands for little grain in Spanish. My online dictionary, though, says grain is called grano in Spanish, and granito means granit. Could it mean a grain of granit = sand?
I'd welcome feedback from any reader with knowledge of Spanish, or the origin of the name.

The only name I have found for this stitch in Japan is the 'Japanglish' プレーンナットステッチ,  Plain Knot Stitch. This is totally incorrect as there is not one single knot involved, plain or (k)not!
Updated: Point de Granitos or Point de Petits Grains are the French names. Thank you Mattia.

On my Aida sampler the Granitos look like this:



Work it like this:
An odd number of straight stitches are  worked between the same two holes.

 
 Make one straight stitch,


place the second on the left,

 the third on the right


 and so on

 building the stitch full and fat.



Mary Corbet at Needle 'n Thread has a nice video.
Annet has a nifty way to tame the thread.

Homework:
Use this stitch creatively. Remember this lesson is Biology!

Friday, 6 October 2017

Friday Homework for Lesson 38: Bosnian Stitch

Student: This was easy and fast. Here's my homework for the Bosnian Stitch.

Teacher: Accepted, but not very impressive. No creative design this time, eh?
Student: No, it was too easy and I was too busy with other things.
Teacher: You and your excuses!
Student: I am fed up with Geography!
Teacher: I am sure you could benefit from more lessons on this subject.
Student: PLEASE, something else, please.
Teacher: OK, let's do some Biology on Sunday.
Student: THANK YOU, Miss.

Wednesday, 4 October 2017

WIPW - A Catch Up and A Start

WIPW is GREAT!
It stands for Work in Progress Wednesday and was started by Sharon Boggon of Pintangle.

Once I got into the habit of reporting my progress on needlework or quilting project every Wednesday, I seem to push myself to have at least a little bit of progress to blog about. With this routine I can see and measure how a project develops. It was good to hold onto it with the Trinity Green quilt as there were so many stages and it took such a long time. Without it I just might have been tempted to shelve the quilt.

So what progress have I got to report on this dull and cloudy Wednesday in Tokyo?
A catch up and a start.


Reference Charts

TAST: I have filled in #147 Raised Cretan

Sunday Stitch School: I have added every one of the 38 stitches learned so far:

I had to use a piece of waste canvas to get the Hungarian stitches even, but it was worth it.

There is space for only four more stitches, then I will have to make a new chart.


New! MOLA
Whenever I visit a major quilt show in Japan (Yokohama International Quilt Week (sadly no longer hosted) and Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival) I enjoy admiring Fumiko Nakayama's stunning Mola quilts.
Last January at the TIGQF in Tokyo Dome, my friends Julie, Tanya and I decided we would challenge ourselves into making something Mola.
Tanya has already made some charming Japanese zodiac signs, and Julie is working hard on a waist coat.

It is high time I got started on the bag I am planning to make.

Not having much of a clue as how these quilts are appliquéd, I went to the library and borrowed one of Ms Nakayama's books. I have also checked the internet for information.
First I had to draw some kind of design. I settled for a floral motif.

I also needed to try the technique out on a small sampler. So I traced a star on a piece of black fabric, placed a red and then a brown piece of fabric underneath. I basted the three layers together. Then I cut open a slit in the black fabric and started reverse appliquéing the black fabric so the red would be visible. 

Once that was done, I cut the red fabric and revere appliquéd it, too. As you can see I am not finished yet.

The next step to learn is cutting slits outside the star and adding small pieces of other colours underneath like you can see on the book cover (turquoise slits at the top).

Tuesday, 3 October 2017

TAST 147: Raised Cretan Stitch


TAST stands for Take A Stitch Tuesday which is an online course of stitches on Sharon Boggon's Pintangle. Join in and learn. If you want to do it from scratch, there will be a rerun starting next year.
Read more about it here.
Learn the stitch here.

As I have explained before, I want all the TAST stitches in one (private) collection and will give them the chronological number in the order I learn them. 
So now it is time for Raised Cretan Stitch,  which I will call TAST #147.





Sunday, 1 October 2017

Sunday Stitch School - Lesson 38: Bosnian Stitch

It's time for another geographical stitch at Sunday Stitch School.
We have been to Rumania and Hungary and will remain in Europe a bit longer.
So let's move south to Balkan and try our hands at the Bosnian Stitch.

French name: Point de Bosnie.


It has a dramatic look, yet is very easy to work.


Start from the right and made vertical straight stitches


 The slanted stitches are worked on the return journey.


 Then do a second row of stitches right below the first row, and so on...


(When this stitch is worked from left to right and the slanted stitches go the other way, the name changes to either Fence Stitch or Barrier Stitch, and is a French stitch rather than Bosnian.)


Your Homework
will be to fill in the next square on the 'fake' canvas.

Friday, 29 September 2017

Friday Homework for Lesson 37: Hungarian Stitch

Today I am well in time to present my homework for Sunday Stitch School!

It was easy and fast work to fill in the canvas square with the Hungarian Stitch:


No need to comment.

Wednesday, 27 September 2017

WIPW - Catching Up

For Work In Progress Wednesday I can report on my catching up on the Sunday Stitch School's Reference Chart.

I added these stitches:

1 Anundsjö
2 Back
3 Cross
4 Danish Knot
5 Emire
6 Four Sided
7 Gate
8 Heavy Chain
9 Interlaced Running
10 Japanese Darning
11 Knotted Satin
12 Lace
13 Mountmellick
14 Norwich
15 Open Chain
16 Punchetto Valsesiano
17 Q
18 Renaissance


Tuesday, 26 September 2017

TAST 146: Whipped Chain Stitch version 2

TAST stands for Take A Stitch Tuesday which is an online course of stitches on Sharon Boggon's Pintangle. Join in and learn. If you want to do it from scratch, there will be a rerun starting next year.
Read more about it here.

As I have explained before, I want all the TAST stitches in one (private) collection and will give them the chronological number in the order I learn them. 
So now it is time for Whipped Chain Stitch, Version 2, which I will call TAST #146.



By whipping the chain on both sides you get a nice 'knitted' pattern. Or one could take it for the Magic Chain Stitch.

On the reference chart: